Passphrase > password

USC ITS has announced that (as of 11/30), the next time you change your USC NetID password, you will need to create a new passphrase of 16 to 64 characters. This change is part of the university’s ongoing efforts to protect your USC accounts and university systems from hacking attempts.

What is my USC NetID password?

Your USC NetID password is the credential that you use to access central USC online tools and resources, including the secure wireless network, MyUSC, Blackboard, and Workday. You may also use it to access school- or unit-based online resources.

What is a passphrase?

Passphrases are typically longer than passwords, less restrictive in terms of character requirements, and easier to remember, as they can be a sentence, phrase, or series of words.

What happens next?

The next time that your USC NetID password or passphrase expires, you will need to create a passphrase that is between 16 and 64 characters. You will no longer have to include a combination of capital and lowercase letters or letters and numbers. There are two primary restrictions:

  • You may not use your USC NetID username as part of your passphrase.
  • You may not reuse your USC NetID password/phrase.

Can I change my password sooner?

While you will not be required to create a longer passphrase until your current password expires, we encourage you to select a stronger passphrase at your earliest convenience. ITS also recommends that you choose a unique passphrase for your USC NetID.

You may change your password at any time. To change your USC NetID passphrase, go to www.usc.edu/changepassword and follow the on-screen instructions. You can also reach this site by clicking or tapping the Change Your Password link in the Popular Logins section of the ITS website.

Getting help

If you have questions or concerns, email security@usc.edu. If you need assistance with your passphrase, contact the ITS Customer Support Center at consult@usc.edu or (213) 740-5555.

And remember – you should never share your passphrases with others. USC will never request your passphrase over the phone or by email.

 

 

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